Tag Archives: students with learning disabilities

Tips to Help Students with Learning Disabilities Study

Students with learning disabilities do well with the right supports and study skills appropriate to their learning style.

Learning disabilities can be challenging for students, but they are not impossible barriers to education. With the right supports, every child can learn. When it comes to studying, coping with a learning disability often means finding the right strategy for the student. The right strategy and a lot of patience can mean the difference between success and failure. The following tips can help parents and students succeed.

Tip #1 – Get organized.

School often means an overwhelming amount of paperwork. Helping your child keep everything organized goes a long way when it comes time to study. Having separate notebooks and folders for each class allows important papers to be at the ready when it comes time to study. Have a dedicated space for homework and studying at home, and make it a routine part of every day.

Tip #2 – Know how your child learns best.

Everyone learns differently. Some children are visual learners, some are kinesthetic learners. You know your child better than anyone else, and know how he or she thinks. Playing to your child’s strengths will help reinforce classroom material and make retention easier.

Tip #3 – Break it down.

Children with learning disabilities often do not know what to study, let alone how to study. These children need explicit information. Talk to your child’s teacher about the specific areas to concentrate on for tests, and review your child’s text books to see what information is being taught.

Tip #4 – Make learning familiar and fun.

One of the best ways to remember facts is to come up with anagrams, word associations, and silly phrases that stick in the brain. Do you remember how to spell “arithmetic”? Maybe not, but you might be able to remember that “A Rat In Tom’s House May Eat Tom’s Ice Cream.” There are lots of memory devices available to help children remember all sorts of complicated facts.

Tip #5 – Develop test taking strategies.

Sometimes, being able to pass a test is about strategy. When it comes to answering questions, teach your child to concentrate on the answers that they are sure of, eliminating some of the choices. With multiple choice questions, remember that one answer is usually obviously wrong. Read the question and answer carefully in order to narrow down the possible correct answer.

Tip #6 – Look at the big picture.

Parents of children with learning disabilities are often focused on the immediate goal. Getting through the third grade may be challenging enough as it is. But the most important thing to remember is that you are preparing your child for the rest of his or her life. Being successful in life requires a healthy, positive attitude and the willingness to work hard. These are attributes that are not measured on tests.

School is difficult enough for most children. Children with learning disabilities often have to work twice as hard, but they can succeed. Set goals, stay positive, and stay focused on what is most important, and your child will succeed not just in school, but in life.

 

Creating the Right Learning Environment for Children with Learning Disabilities

An environment conducive to learning can help students with learning disabilities focus on their homework.

While all children need a little help and guidance with their homework from time to time, those who diagnosed with learning disabilities may require more support than most. For the parents of students with learning disabilities, it is important to be aware of ways in which this guidance and help can be provided without the parents actually taking over.

It is just as important for students with learning disabilities to be able to understand the work that they are doing at home as it is for those without learning disabilities. Parents need to find ways to help their child while still ensuring that he or she is the one that does the work.

Ways Parents Can Help

There are a number of ways in which you can help children with learning disabilities when it comes to their homework:

  • Establish a homework schedule: It is a good idea to develop a routine and establish a schedule. This increased organization can help your child get into a routine when it comes to completing homework and also means that you can ensure you are around when homework is being completed.
  •  Eliminate distractions: The last thing a child with learning difficulties needs is a load of distractions such as televisions, radios, and lots of noise. Therefore, make sure you set up a quiet area where your child can study in peace and focus on what needs to be done.
  •  Arrange regular breaks: If your child has a particularly lengthy homework assignment to complete, make sure you arrange regular breaks. This can help to increase focus and concentration, particularly for those who have ADD or ADHD.
  •  Hire a tutor: It can be highly beneficial for a child with learning disabilities to have extra support from a professional. You will find a number of tutors with experience and expertise in supporting those with learning difficulties, so this is an option you may want to consider for your child.
  •  Don’t pressure: Although you may be keen for your child to get their homework assignment completed on time, you may find that a child with learning disabilities reaches a saturation point where he or she is simply unable to take in any more. If this happens, make sure you don’t pressure or force your child to continue, as this could do more damage than good. Instead, write a note for the teacher explaining the situation.

Creating the Right Environment

These are a few of the ways in which you can make homework assignments easier for your child to tackle. Remember, children with learning disabilities can become distracted more easily, which makes it all the more important to create the right environment in your home. A big part of helping your child will be to both establish a routine and create a space in the home that is conducive to learning.

Ways Students with Learning Disabilities Can Improve SAT Test Scores

Students with learning disabilities may need extra help to study for college entrance exams. Your teacher and a tutor are great resources to consider.

Students with learning disabilities may need extra help to study for college entrance exams. Your teacher and a tutor are great resources to consider.

Studying can be quite a challenging task for all students because of reasons like lack of interest and short attention span. Studying is even more difficult when you combine the two reasons above with learning disabilities. Here are some tips on how students with learning disabilities can study better and hence, score good grades on big exams like the SAT.

Identify the Problem

The first thing to do is to pinpoint what the problem is. For example, the problem could be an extremely short attention span. If you know what the problem is, you can find the right approach to deal with it. If you spend most of your days studying but you are not getting the results you want, it could mean that you do not have the right study skills. Pay attention to yourself and find out what your problem is.

Organize Content You Need to Study

For exams such as the SAT, it is usually very taxing content-wise. There are a lot of materials and topics to study for. This can get very confusing and discouraging for a student with learning disabilities. The solution to this problem is to be very organized. List all the subjects and topics that are required for the SAT, and check them off one by one as you move along on your revision route. This way, you will feel like there is less clutter and things are more systematic.

Listen up!

Teachers are the experienced exam-takers. They are a great source for clues and tips for your big exam. More often than not, teachers may drop hints about important information on what to focus on and what to spend less time studying for. Try to pick out verbal cues from your teachers. Clues can be words such as “write this down” or “listen up”. When you hear your teachers say these verbal cues, be sure to write it down, mark it or flag the pages so that you know what you should be studying.

Don’t Forget the “Cheat Sheets”

Yes, there are cheat sheets available. They are located at the end of every chapter in your textbooks. These cheat sheets are called “chapter review”. Textbooks these days offer these review pages with questions you can answer. If you have trouble with chunks of texts in your textbooks, the important parts of the chapter will be highlighted in this review portion. Be sure to take note of what is mentioned in the review pages, and then go back to the chapter and read up on it again, this time, paying more attention to the new information you have just learned. The questions in the review sections are also helpful – they can help you see how much you have understood from reading the chapter as well as summarizes the entire chapter.

Getting the Most from In-Home Tutoring if Your Child has Learning Disabilities

Students with learning disabilities can benefit from in-home tutoring as well as routine homework time.

Students with learning disabilities can benefit from in-home tutoring as well as routine homework time.

Homework is intended to be review for children learn in school. By practicing new concepts and principles, children are better able to remember and apply them. For students with learning disabilities, homework time can be frustrating. In-home tutoring is an excellent way to help your child complete assignments and build on knowledge learned in the classroom.

But you should not rely 100% on in-home tutoring to help your child. There are ways you can turn homework time into a success even if the tutor is not present.

Make a Homework Calendar

With the help of your child’s teacher, establish a homework calendar for your child with columns for the day’s assignments, your comments and the teacher’s notes. Make sure that your child comes home with the calendar every evening and returns it to his teacher the following day at school.

Prepare In/Out Folders

Get two folders of different colors and label one “Homework In” and the other “Homework Out”. Explain to your child that all assigned tasks for the day go into the “in” folder to bring home. Teach your child to place all completed homework into the “out” folder every evening to hand in to his teacher the next morning.

Establish a Routine (and Stick to It!)

Children with learning disabilities thrive on consistency. Fix a set time and place for homework and stick to this schedule as much as possible. Abrupt changes in routine may upset your child and distract her from doing her homework.

Divide and Conquer

Review the homework with your child first before starting. If your child has a short attention span, break the homework down to manageable chunks that your child can work through one at a time without being easily frustrated.

Adapt Homework to Your Child

No two homework assignments are the same. Adapt the task to your child’s ability to finish it alone or with your help. Depending on child’s specific disability, begin with easy homework to build her confidence. If your child loses interest quickly, then get longer homework out of the way first before taking a break.

Know When to Stop

There’s a limit to your child’s ability to concentrate, especially at the end of a long school day. Take short breaks for your child to recharge and recuperate. If she keeps hitting roadblocks, then it’s probably time to call it a day. Make a note on the homework calendar informing her teacher of the situation and revise the incomplete homework another day.

Make Homework Accommodations

There are times when you may need to make certain accommodations to assist your child with her homework. Read an assignment to her or explain how to work out a math problem according to what she’s learned in school. Focus on the importance of understanding the lesson instead of simply getting her homework done.

Ensure Open Communication

Have regular meetings with your child’s teachers to keep abreast with her learning problems in school. Being aware of your child’s struggles is half the battle won. If you see little improvement in your child, don’t hesitate to ask for extra help through tutors or education specialists.

Following these recommendations help leverage the benefits of in-home tutoring. Your child can meet or exceed academic goals when everyone works together!