Category Archives: Study Skills Training

Study Tips to Help Students Excel in High School

Using proven study tips can help students achieve academic goals.

In high school, the pressure is on. Good grades and extracurricular activities are all geared towards getting into the college of your dreams. With the extra work load of advanced classes and, for many students, a part-time job, the need to effectively complete assignments and study becomes harder still. However, a few pieces of advice can help any student do better in school.

1.  Time management is your most important skill.

Frequently, a high school student comes home with what seems to be an insurmountable amount of homework. “How am I ever going to get it all done?” they ask, and then wind up being unable to complete any of it because of disorganization. Simply being able to pause, and plan out what needs to be completed in the available time should see every assignment completed, with spare time left over for all-important socializing and recreation.

2.  Work on your studies every day.

Cramming and pulling all-nighters may seem like the cool thing to do, but they are counterproductive. Simple things like reviewing your notes each night can keep the material fresh in your mind, retained in your memory and eliminate the need for panicked last-minute attempts to memorize everything.

3.  Stay organized.

It is very easy to become overwhelmed with the amount of paperwork, textbooks and notebooks that high school requires. Keeping it all organized will better allow you to find needed information so that you can use it for studying. Also, nothing tanks your grade faster than missed homework assignments. Adding a bunch of needless zeros into your grade can drop an A down to a C (or worse) very quickly.

4.  Participate in class.

This may sound like common sense, but when you actively participate in class discussions and activities, you retain more of the information that is being presented. Contributing to the class and paying attention will have your mind thinking about the material, not just passively absorbing information that will soon be forgotten.

5.  Set goals for yourself.

No one plans to fail, but committing yourself towards a desired end will motivate you to try your best to make those goals a reality. Just remember to make sure that you set reasonable goals. Setting an unreasonable goal will only result in failure. If this happens, you will be even more frustrated and disappointed. Figure out a good set of goals, and work hard to achieve them

6.  Learn how to take good notes.

Being able to follow a discussion and jot down the most important points is one skill that you will definitely need in college. High school allows you the opportunity to learn and refine this skill. Your teacher can always help you improve your note taking, and comparing notes with other classmates can reinforce important concepts.

High school is an important time in your education. Parents and teacher expect you to work independently and complete assignments on time. With the right attitude and the belief that you can do well, these study tips can help put you on the path of high school success.

Tips to Help Students with Learning Disabilities Study

Students with learning disabilities do well with the right supports and study skills appropriate to their learning style.

Learning disabilities can be challenging for students, but they are not impossible barriers to education. With the right supports, every child can learn. When it comes to studying, coping with a learning disability often means finding the right strategy for the student. The right strategy and a lot of patience can mean the difference between success and failure. The following tips can help parents and students succeed.

Tip #1 – Get organized.

School often means an overwhelming amount of paperwork. Helping your child keep everything organized goes a long way when it comes time to study. Having separate notebooks and folders for each class allows important papers to be at the ready when it comes time to study. Have a dedicated space for homework and studying at home, and make it a routine part of every day.

Tip #2 – Know how your child learns best.

Everyone learns differently. Some children are visual learners, some are kinesthetic learners. You know your child better than anyone else, and know how he or she thinks. Playing to your child’s strengths will help reinforce classroom material and make retention easier.

Tip #3 – Break it down.

Children with learning disabilities often do not know what to study, let alone how to study. These children need explicit information. Talk to your child’s teacher about the specific areas to concentrate on for tests, and review your child’s text books to see what information is being taught.

Tip #4 – Make learning familiar and fun.

One of the best ways to remember facts is to come up with anagrams, word associations, and silly phrases that stick in the brain. Do you remember how to spell “arithmetic”? Maybe not, but you might be able to remember that “A Rat In Tom’s House May Eat Tom’s Ice Cream.” There are lots of memory devices available to help children remember all sorts of complicated facts.

Tip #5 – Develop test taking strategies.

Sometimes, being able to pass a test is about strategy. When it comes to answering questions, teach your child to concentrate on the answers that they are sure of, eliminating some of the choices. With multiple choice questions, remember that one answer is usually obviously wrong. Read the question and answer carefully in order to narrow down the possible correct answer.

Tip #6 – Look at the big picture.

Parents of children with learning disabilities are often focused on the immediate goal. Getting through the third grade may be challenging enough as it is. But the most important thing to remember is that you are preparing your child for the rest of his or her life. Being successful in life requires a healthy, positive attitude and the willingness to work hard. These are attributes that are not measured on tests.

School is difficult enough for most children. Children with learning disabilities often have to work twice as hard, but they can succeed. Set goals, stay positive, and stay focused on what is most important, and your child will succeed not just in school, but in life.