Category Archives: Study Skills Training

Tips on Balancing a Job and Preparing for the GED Exam

Getting your GED expands your job opportunities. Tutoring can help you pass the exam the first time you take it!

Getting your GED expands your job opportunities. Tutoring can help you pass the exam the first time you take it!

Taking the GED test is an important step for many who did not complete high school.  Passing this test certifies that your “General Education Development” is equivalent to a high-school senior who graduates through a traditional school system. For people whose education got interrupted for any number of reasons, they can obtain this equivalency and pursue further studies or career goals. Most employers and colleges consider the certificates based on passing of GED to be an equivalent of high-school graduation. The GED test is designed to test the capability of a candidate in Math, Reading, Writing, Social Studies and Science. Taking practice tests and then following up with study of the material equivalent to the school curriculum is the best way to get ready for it.

GED 2014 Version

GED tests have been revised several times since they were first made available. The last revision was in 2002 to bring it up to the latest standards in schools. Prior to this, it was found that a large majority of the test takers look at it as a means to access higher education. Only about 30% of the test takers considered GED certification as a means to better employment. This is contrary to expectations on which this test was introduced. It was thought a candidate with an education equivalent to a high school graduate will help open up employment opportunities. This test is expected to be revised in January 2014. It is being redesigned to better test for college preparedness. More importantly, the test will not be on paper any more but will be taken interactively on computers. This is a significant change for test takers.

Preparing for the GED

People planning to take the GED are those whose high school studies have been interrupted. They will have some catching up to do depending on how long they have been out of the school system or when their home schooling stopped. It is possible they may not be familiar with computers the way school students are. So, in addition to preparing for the Math, Science, Social Studies and the reading and writing, they must catch up with computer usage very quickly. If you are already using a computer on your job, this process will be much easier for you. The computer training does not need to be extensive. You simply need to be able to use the computer sufficiently to answer questions timely. The best strategy is to take online practice tests.

If you have a job, it is recommended you develop a study plan. You will need to balance the demands of your test prep with the time you must spend on the job. Whether you are brushing up and adding to your subject knowledge or preparing for the practice tests, private tutoring can help you score higher on your test. We offer private test prep tutoring here to students who want to pass the GED test the first time they take it. Contact us today!

Tips for Helping Teens in Foster Care with Homework

Teens in foster care benefit from tutoring as well as structured homework time.

Teens in foster care benefit from tutoring as well as structured and consistent homework time.

It is common for youth in foster care to be behind their peers academically. Although younger children may be more willing to spend time on homework, teens in foster care may rebel against foster parents or guardians who try to get them focused on academic goals. In-home tutoring can provide the motivation teens need to do well in school. Tutors with experience working with kids who are several grades behind where they should be can boost a child’s confidence and get them thinking about their future.

However, a tutor cannot be with your foster child all the time. There are steps you can take to provide an environment conducive to learning. Here’s how foster parents and guardians can help teens with homework without turning these after-school study sessions into a dreaded war of wills:

Be Organized

Homework hour is all about making sure your teen has sufficient time to complete assigns while he still has energy. Make sure your chores are completed beforehand so she has your undivided attention if she needs it. Turn off the television and eliminate other distractions that can interrupt a teen’s concentration. Actions counter to these recommendations send a message to your child that homework isn’t a priority.

Be Consistent

Establishing a reliable routine is just as important as helping your teen with homework. Set a designated time and place for schoolwork. Have everything your child needs at hand, including reference books, a computer, dictionary, and writing paper. Your child has a limited attention span, so don’t waste it by having him hunt around for an eraser.

Take a Break

After school, give your teen some downtime before hitting the books again at home. Have a healthy snack while chatting about her day at school. Discover what she learned in class and if she faced problems during a particular lesson. Reassure her that homework reinforces learning. This is your opening to start the day’s assignments.

Learn the Lesson

Nothing frustrates a teen more than a difficult homework assignment and nothing annoys you more that not being able to help her. Take time to study the material before trying to teach your child how to find the correct answers. If you don’t understand the lesson, find someone who does. An in-home or online tutor can provide assistance when you need it.

Think Outside the Box

Learning should be fun. Change settings by doing homework at the library instead of at home. Experiment with various methods of imparting the same knowledge to your child and see which ones work best to help her understand her homework.

Limit Homework Time

Your teen has spent almost an entire day in school, learning many subjects in a closed classroom environment. At home, keep homework time between 15 to 20 minute increments. Forcing your tired child to spend longer than 20 minutes on homework may produce resentment against extra assignments and discourage learning in general.

Offer Constructive Feedback

If your child has a tough time with a particular task, be patient and suggest different approaches to the problem instead of berating his inability to find a solution. Remember that homework is practice for what your child has already learned in class. Go through the lesson with her briefly before taking another shot at the answer.

Monitor Progress

Keep tabs on your teen’s progress in school. His struggle with homework may point towards learning difficulties during class. Discuss the issue with his teachers or attend parent-teacher meetings to find out more about the teaching methods employed in school and ways you can help at home.

Tutoring can help teens in foster care catch up with their peers and prepare them for graduation. Contact us today if your teen needs tutoring!